Sunday, December 11, 2005

New Long Term Data on Lunesta

The National Sleep Foundation reports:
A recent study conducted by Thomas Roth, PhD, a sleep researcher at the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, James K. Walsh, PhD, executive director and senior scientist at the Sleep Medicine and Research Center at St. Luke’s Hospital in St. Louis and fellow researchers investigated whether eszopiclone (Lunesta™) is effective for the long-term treatment of insomnia. Currently, the median duration of clinical trials evaluating the effectiveness of sleeping pills is one week. While a few studies have tested hypnotic agents for longer, Roth, Walsh and fellow researchers sought to find out how eszopiclone would treat insomnia over a year’s time. The first six months of the trial followed standard trial procedures – double-blind, placebo-controlled and randomized. The second six months the study was conducted "open-label," meaning the drug would be tested under conditions where both researchers and patients knew they were being treated with eszopiclone.
The study of 471 participants ages 21-64 found that eszopiclone was effective and well-tolerated for the length of the study. Researchers saw improvements in both six-month phases of the study, and they argue that the open-label phase was a valuable tool to assess the effectiveness of a medication in a real-life (or clinical) setting. Nevertheless, they note that they did not study what effects discontinuation of the medication would have upon these participants after the one-year trial. While the results of this study indicate that there is the potential for medication to treat chronic insomnia, more research on all areas of treatment for insomnia is necessary. Per the National Institute of Health’s state-of-the-science’s findings, "a substantial public and private research effort is warranted, including developing research tools and conducting longitudinal studies of randomized clinical trials."

I'll comment further on Lunesta when the actual study is published.

4 comments:

BotanicalGirl said...

I see you've closed reader questions, but you also don't have an email address anywhere I see on site. I was directed over here because of this post: http://botanicalgirl.blogspot.com/2005/12/3-oclock-slump.html

which I wrote about fatigue. I should be seeing a sleep specialist in person soon (I hope), but wondered if you had input. My email is listed on my blog if you'd like to go there.

Sorry if I hijacked your comments. Your blog seems interesting; I'll probably blogroll it if I remember.

Michael Rack, MD said...

Botanicalgirl, I looked over that entry on your blog. With your long daily sleep times and your sleepiness, you should discuss the possible diagnosis of idiopathic hypersomnia with your doctor.
http://www.beatcfsandfms.org/references/IdiopathicHypersomnia.html
The evaluation for idiopathic hypersomnia would be similar to that for narcolepsy, with an overnight sleep study and a daytime nap study (MSLT). Idiopathic hypersomnia often starts after a viral illness.

Michael Rack, MD said...

sorry, that previous link isn't working out right, try this:
http://www.modafinil.com/idiopathic-hypersomnia.html

dghnfgj said...

In English class, one girl Cheap WoW Gold said never give up when discussing. It just reminded me wow goldsomething about myself.WoW Gold Maybe it is wow power leveling something about love.WoW Gold My love, which began on July 3rd of WoW Gold 2005 and finished on August wow leveling 23rd of 2008, taught me many things. wow leveling It is not a pleasant world of warcraft power leveling thing to look back on world of warcraft power leveling that. But I know I world of warcraft power leveling must learn something from it,world of warcraft leveling no matter what it is, world of warcraft leveling happiness or sorrow.Our wow gold love did not go on so smoothly and we went through many things.