Monday, August 14, 2006

CPAP use by Children


SAN JUAN, P.R. — Continuous positive airway pressure can be effective for obstructive sleep apnea in children, but parents must be persistent to ensure children's acceptance of the treatment, Dr. Ann C. Halbower said at a meeting sponsored by the American College of Chest Physicians.
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is present in 2%–3% of children, and peaks at 3–6 years of age—which is also the peak age for adenotonsillar hypertrophy. The presentation depends on the age of the child: In the infant, it might present as sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Toddlers with OSA will have hyperactivity, school-age children will have failure to thrive and poor school performance, and adolescents may present with obesity and excessive daytime sleepiness.
Adenotonsillectomy is the first-line therapy for children with OSA. When that is not successful, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) can promote more ordered breathing during sleep and relieve OSA.
CPAP can be problematic in children, however. “It's very hard to take. Little kids don't like it, but there are things parents and physicians can do to help make CPAP more palatable,” said Dr. Halbower, who serves as medical director of the pediatric sleep disorders program at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore. Dr. Halbower recommended introducing the device slowly to minimize the fear factor. Put on the mask while the child is awake and doing an activity that is fun and pleasurable, she said.
The worst thing you can do is put the mask on while the child is asleep. “If they wake up and find themselves wearing the mask, they'll panic,” Dr. Halbower said
Another trick that can be used to make CPAP part of the child's normal bedtime routine, along with brushing the teeth and a bedtime story. Other children who use CPAP are wonderful ambassadors for the device and can help relieve anxiety with a show-and-tell. Videos are good for this as well.
Despite these efforts, some children will do everything to resist attempts to put on the mask. Many parents will remove the mask in response to their child's distress.
That is a big mistake, Dr. Halbower said, because it just strengthens the child's escape and avoidance behavior. Eventually, the parent gives up.
Behavioral training can help parents block or prevent their child's avoidance behavior by using brief verbal prompting, redirection to a specific task, and if necessary, physically blocking escape while gently guiding the child to remain in the situation.
The child's attempt to remove the mask must be physically interrupted and the mask replaced immediately every time the child removes it. She said these behavioral techniques are used in her clinic under the guidance of Keith Slifer, Ph.D., a behavioral psychologist. [The techniques] “have proved very successful,” Dr. Halbower said.
Parents should also plan for safety in children who cannot remove the mask during emergencies, Dr. Halbower cautioned.
Use a nasal mask instead of a full-face mask, or have an emergency pull string that can disengage the mask to prevent aspiration or asphyxiation if the child vomits.
It is important for parents to establish a consistent bedtime routine that lasts about 30 minutes, Dr. Halbower explained. Such a routine includes soothing activities, and it always ends with the child putting on the CPAP mask, lying down, and going to sleep.
“Persistence and patience are key,” she said.

Adenotonsellectomy usually cures childhood obstructive sleep apnea. However, many obese children with OSA will end up needing CPAP.

3 comments:

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